Using Jenkins CI for UI testing. Will Selenium do?

If you’ve ever used Jenkins CI for UI testing automation, you probably know it’s a terrific scheduler. Sure, Jenkins isn’t the only tool of its kind, but continuous integration with Jenkins has several advantages over other CI platforms. Namely: Jenkins is open-source, award-winning, and supported by an independent board of programming veterans from Yahoo!, Microsoft and RedHat. Being a mainstream CI tool, Jenkins has great documentation and a vibrant, booming community. Even though Jenkins CI is not as easy to configure as TeamCity, it's still pleasantly manageable. Jenkins has hundreds of plugins available. Moreover, developers often give Jenkins higher priority over its Oracle-controlled counterpart Hudson when rolling out updates and new plugins. Okay, Jenkins is uber-awesome… unless you use it to schedule Selenium UI tests Jenkins does everything you’d expect from a robust CI solution. It’s great when used with most types of automated testing tools, too — as long as we’re talking unit and API tests. Things tend to get trickier, however, once you try using Jenkins with an old-school UI testing automation tool like Selenium. Okay, that last statement might irk some Selenium fans, so let me explain myself while they’re getting their pitchforks and torches ready:). Or... More

CI-friendly UI testing automation tools: what are your options?

UI testing automation is all the fuss today. In a way, this is due to an advent of new solutions that promise to outperform the “tried-and-true” tools of the past years. But how many of these automated testing tools (both new and old) are CI-friendly? Besides, how many of them are good at handling visual testing of websites and web apps? Let’s see what the market of UI automation testing has to offer in the way of CI support. But first, let’s answer the following question. Does solid CI support really matter for UI testing automation solutions? The short answer is yes. After all, continuous integration solutions are the first line of defense against bugs and errors. Let’s recall what a typical CI process looks like: one job creates a build, and another one launches unit tests on it. This setup allows for early spotting of most easy-to-find problems. If the build passes this stage successfully, testers can step in with their usual routine. They’ll take a quick look at the UI and, if everything is fine, proceed with functional testing. Now, this process seems to have room for improvement, doesn’t it? Wouldn’t it be super awesome to automate this... More

CI for CSS regression testing with Screenster

Now that the CI integration plugin has been successfully rolled out, it is time to recall how it all began... Ready for a tale about defeating a horde of CSS regression testing challenges with the help of a Jenkins server and a visual QA automation tool? Why did we need CSS regression tests on our CI Our team has realized the necessity of automating the visual regression testing process last winter, when our other product AjaxSwing gained a significant number of new users, who were actively requesting improvements. A new version was released each week, sometimes even more often. AjaxSwing generates web UI for desktop applications so you can imagine how much visual UI verification we had to accomplish each time a build was ready. It just seemed never-ending. We had unit tests in our continuous integration environment running against every new build, but they didn’t help with verifying the visual aspects of the UI such as CSS, formatting and layouts. That’s when our QA team decided it is time to try our new automation testing tool Screenster in real action, despite it being in its early Beta at the time. We upgraded our CI environment to the following state:... More

Integration with CI tools — a new plugin for Screenster

Good news! Now you can easily run Screenster visual tests in your continuous integration environment. Just visit the Downloads page on our Portal, get the CI plugin and follow our guidelines to install it and synchronize with your favorite CI tool. We have been receiving dozens of questions from our customers and guests lately about a way to closely integrate Screenster with CI platform to run CSS and web UI regression tests. This necessity is absolutely clear: it is often critically important to run quick visual tests against your web application with the help of an automation testing tool after each new fix or feature deployment. Our users have a variety of CI tools such as Jenkins, Bamboo, TeamCity, Travis and others so we designed a universal solution that works with all of them. It took a lot of efforts and hot discussions, but finally the plugin is here for you! Enjoy running visual tests on your CI server and feel free to leave a comment here about your experience!   [raw] Want to try Screenster on the cloud? Try Online [/raw]    
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